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An Ancient, Unified Mechanism for Metformin Growth Inhibition in C. elegans and Cancer

March 4, 2017

Summary Metformin is best known as first line treatment for type 2 diabetes, but in recent years it has become clear that it has anti-cancer properties and prolongs lifespan in a variety of model organisms. In spite of these remarkable effects, the mechanism by which metformin produces them remains elusive. NORCH investigator Dr. Alexander Soukas and colleagues determined that metformin kills human cancer cells and prolongs lifespan in the roundworm C. elegans by a common mechanism involving the nuclear pore complex and a gene of unknown function ACAD10. Metformin’s action on mitochondria leads to “closing” of the nuclear pore, reducing … Read More »

Categories: Publications Tags: Harvard Medical School

Effects of Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass and Sleeve Gastrectomy on Bone Mineral Density and Marrow Adipose Tissue

March 2, 2017

Summary Through support from a Pilot & Feasibility award, Dr. Elaine Yu and colleagues investigated changes in bone mineral density (BMD) and marrow adipose tissue (MAT) in 20 adults with morbid obesity undergoing Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB, n=11) or sleeve gastrectomy (SG, n=10).  At 1 year after surgery, mean weight loss was the same between RYGB and SG groups, and mean calcium, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, and PTH levels were unchanged and with normal in both groups.  P1NP and CTX increased in both RYGB and SG groups, and P1NP increased more in the RYGB group.  There were significant declines from baseline in … Read More »

Categories: Publications Tags: Harvard Medical School

Adipose-Derived Circulating miRNAs Regulate Gene Expression in Other Tissues

March 1, 2017

Summary MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are non-coding RNAs that negatively regulate translation and are involved in multiple cellular processes. A large portion of circulating miRNAs are contained in exosomes. Dr. Kahn and colleagues demonstrated that adipose tissue is an important source of circulating miRNAs by showing that mice with an adipose-tissue-specific knockout of the miRNA processing enzyme Dicer have a significantly decreased number of circulating exosomal miRNAs. Further, fat transplantation from normal mice into mice with fat-specific Dicer knockout restores normal levels of circulating miRNAs.  Humans with decreased fat due to lipodystrophy – both HIV-associated and congenital generalized lipodystrophy – also demonstrate significant reductions … Read More »

Categories: Publications Tags: Harvard Medical School

Choice Architecture to Promote Fruit and Vegetable Purchases by Families Participating in the Special Supplemental Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC): Randomized Corner Store Pilot Study

February 28, 2017

Summary Through support from a Pilot & Feasibility award, Dr. Anne Thorndike and colleagues assessed the efficacy of a choice architecture intervention in corner stores to increase fruit and vegetable purchase by families participating in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC).  Six stores were randomly assigned to a choice architecture intervention vs. no intervention.  The intervention consisted of consultation with store owners to determine ways to increase the visibility of fruits and vegetables and to provide necessary resources such as new shelving or containers to achieve this goal.  During the intervention period, WIC fruit and … Read More »

Categories: Publications Tags: Harvard Medical School

University of Michigan Regional Comprehensive Metabolomics Resource Core – Pilot and Feasibility Program

January 19, 2017

The University of Michigan Regional Comprehensive Metabolomics Resource Core (MRC)2 requests proposals for funding during the 2017 grant year (RFA found here). The Pilot and Feasibility program is intended to provide opportunities for investigators to advance basic, clinical and translational biomedical science by incorporating metabolomic technologies into their research program. The goal of this program is to enable investigators to generate a sufficient body of preliminary information for a successful application for major research funding from NIH or other national granting agencies. Submission Deadline: Tuesday, March 16, 2017 Award Cycle: July 1, 2017 – June 30, 2018 Discipline/Subject Area: Metabolomics Funding Available: 50,000 Submission: Apply through the University of Michigan … Read More »

Categories: Funding Tags: University of Michigan

Physical Activity Good for Your Health, But What’s Happening Below the Surface?

January 5, 2017

New grant from National Institutes of Health will allow U-M researchers to focus on molecular changes that occur during and after exercise The University of Michigan was recently awarded $8.2 million from the National Institutes of Health to investigate the molecular changes that occur during and after physical activity. U-M is one of several centers throughout the United States to receive a grant from the NIH to participate in the Molecular Transducers of Physical Activity Consortium (MoTrPAC). The 6-year funding will begin this month and will allow U-M to establish the Michigan Chemical Analysis Site within the Consortium. The Consortium … Read More »

Categories: Featured News, News Tags: University of Michigan

Boston NORC Small Grants Program

December 1, 2016

Small grants of up to $3,000 (direct costs only) will be awarded to investigators who are interested in utilizing the BNORC cores for the purpose of gathering critical preliminary data for a future grant application or to complete a funded project. Adipose Biology and Nutrient Metabolism (at Boston Medical Center and Tufts University) Epidemiology and Genetics (at Harvard School of Public Health) Functional Genomics and Bioinformatics Core (at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center) Transgenic (at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center) iDXA Administrative Core (at Boston Medical Center) Preference will be given to junior investigators, senior investigators who are investigating a … Read More »

Categories: Funding Tags: Boston

UNC Food for All Campus Lecture Series: Spring 2017 Call for Proposals

November 30, 2016

Are you engaged in exciting food-related research, teaching, and publication at UNC? Do you have an idea for an outstanding food-related lecturer (scholars, journalists, documentarians, community activists, food entrepreneurs, artisans, practitioners) to bring to campus? UNC-Chapel Hill’s Food for All (FFA) pan-university academic theme is sponsoring a multi-disciplinary food studies lecture series, and is seeking proposals from the university community. Micro-grants are available for speaker events with an expectation of cost-sharing between FFA and the co-sponsoring department, institute, or organization. Food for All is currently accepting proposals for speakers during the spring of 2017. Preference will be given to events that … Read More »

Categories: Featured News, Funding Tags: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Effect of Zinc Supplementation on Insulin Secretion: Interaction Between Zinc and SLC30A8 Genotype in Old Order Amish

November 1, 2016

Abstract SLC30A8 encodes a zinc transporter in the beta cell, and individuals with a common missense variant in this gene experience a lower early insulin response to glucose and an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. We hypothesized that zinc supplementation may improve insulin secretion in a genotype-dependent manner.  To test this hypothesis, we evaluated the early insulin response to glucose (using frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance testing) by SLC30A8 genotype before and after 14 days of supplementation with oral zinc acetate twice daily in 55 healthy non-diabetic Amish individuals. Key Findings Individuals with the risk allele had the lowest … Read More »

Categories: Publications Tags: Mid-Atlantic Maryland

Low FODMAP Diet and IBS

October 15, 2016

A new study from University of Michigan finds a change in diet, can help people treat Irritable Bowel Syndrome. It’s based on a low FODMAP diet. FODMAP, a frequently recommended diet, which stands for Fermentable Oligo-Di-Monosaccharides and Polyols. FODMAPS are different types of sugar and fiber that ferment and cause G.I. symptoms in some people. A new study from University of Michigan finds a change in diet, can help people treat Irritable Bowel Syndrome. The diet excludes many compounds found in wheat, some fruits and vegetables, garlic, onions and sugar substitutes. Gastroenterologist, Dr. William Chey and registered dietitian Lauren Van … Read More »

Categories: Featured News, News Tags: University of Michigan